Archive for category Video

[VIDEO] What is Hemianopsia, Causes,Types,Symptoms,Diagnosis,Treatment – YouTube

What is hemianopsia

Overview: Hemianopsia is a loss of vision in half of your visual field of one eye or both eyes. Common causes are:

  • stroke
  • brain tumor
  • trauma to the brain

Normally, the left half of your brain receives visual information from the right side of both eyes, and vice versa.

Some information from your optic nerves crosses to the other half of the brain using an X-shaped structure called the optic chiasm. When any part of this system is damaged, the result can be a partial or complete loss of vision in the visual field.

What causes hemianopsia?

Hemianopsia can occur when there’s damage to the:

  • optic nerves
  • optic chiasm
  • visual processing regions of the brain

The most common causes of brain damage that can result in hemianopsia are:

  • stroke
  • tumors
  • traumatic head injuries

Less commonly, brain damage can also be caused by:

  • aneurysm
  • infection
  • exposure to toxins
  • transient events, such as seizures or migraines

Types of hemianopsia

With hemianopsia, you can see only part of the visual field for each eye. Hemianopsia is classified by the part of your visual field that’s missing:

bitemporal: outer half of each visual field

homonymous: the same half of each visual field

right homonymous: right half of each visual field

left homonymous: left half of each visual field

superior: upper half of each visual field

inferior: lower half of each visual field

via What is Hemianopsia, Causes,Types,Symptoms,Diagnosis,Treatment – YouTube

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[VIDEO] THE BRAIN DISCOVERY SERIES Issue 4: What to do when chaos in the brain occurs? — Dr. Kester J Nedd

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After injury to the brain- what happens to you and to your brain? I detailed this process on my latest Instagram post (and in the image below/to the right), but the big question remains of what should one do when injury happens and chaos in the brain takes over?

In this video blog, I identify and describe the steps that should be taken when this chaos occurs

1.Preserve

2. Restore

3. Compensate

followed by how the Brain Hierarchical Evaluation and Treatment (BHET) Method is used to achieve them.

Since the BHET Method’s main focus is understanding the levels of disorganization and the degree of disruption of brain cycles, this approach allows us to predict outcomes and offer appropriate restorative treatments.

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The brain has over one hundred billion nerve cells that communicate through over one thousand trillion connections

These connections are the command center for what we do, feel, and for just about everything that makes us who we are.

Just imagine what happens when these connections get messed up and break.

via THE BRAIN DISCOVERY SERIES Issue 4: What to do when chaos in the brain occurs? — Dr. Kester J Nedd

 

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[VIDEO] THE BRAIN DISCOVERY SERIES Issue 3: The Healing Brain — Dr. Kester J Nedd

Changes occur every second in this world- and our body and brain are no exception to this. From the moment we are conceived to when we die, adaption takes place. In our brain, the key driver of this change is neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticity has to do with how we restore the brain to maintain function following an injury, how we organize and develop the brain’s structure and physiology, and how we preserve our brain connections as we age.

In this video, Ellie and I discuss this neuroplasticity and how it heals the brain!

Adaptation is necessary for our growth, our survival, and our healing. Thankfully, the brain uses neuroplasticity for just that.

via THE BRAIN DISCOVERY SERIES Issue 3: The Healing Brain — Dr. Kester J Nedd

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[TED Talk] To overcome challenges, stop comparing yourself to others – Dean Furness

When you stop comparing yourself to others, you can accomplish great things, says wheelchair athlete Dean Furness. He shares how, after losing the use of his legs in an accident, he discovered a powerful new mindset focused on redefining his “personal average” and getting better little by little.

via Dean Furness: To overcome challenges, stop comparing yourself to others | TED Talk

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[TED-Ed] The psychology of post-traumatic stress disorder

Many of us will experience some kind of trauma during our lifetime. Sometimes, we escape with no long-term effects. But for millions of people, those experiences linger, causing symptoms like flashbacks, nightmares, and negative thoughts that interfere with everyday life. Joelle Rabow Maletis details the science behind post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.

via The psychology of post-traumatic stress disorder – Joelle | TED-Ed

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[WEB PAGE] 8 Exercise Videos For Disabled People During Isolation

Woman sat cross legged on the floor with her hands together

The lockdown means that a lot of us are inevitably getting less exercise. But there are so many online exercise sessions and videos popping up, that it’s proving harder to find an excuse not to stay fit! Here, writer and fitness instructor Mish, who has autism, rounds up 8 online exercise videos for disabled people of all ages and abilities.

Regular exercise, whether that be simple movement, stretches or even some aerobic work, tailored to your level of fitness and abilities, is so important.

With the current lockdown conditions, many people are unable to leave the house. Unfortunately, it is not as easy to get your daily dose of movement and exercise when you feel you are trapped inside all day.

So it’s great to see so many organisations creating varied, adapted and fun exercises videos to suit a whole range of people and disabilities. I hope some of these will help you, whatever your situation.

1. Joint exercises

It is vital that we maintain healthy use of our joints, to the best of our individual abilities. Even amongst my non-disabled clients, I find that they regularly suffer from joint immobility due to underuse of particular movements.

This video from IvanaExercise really targets all the joints in our body, and is demonstrated by wheelchair users alongside non-disabled people. It’ll also give you a good general workout too.

Keep in mind that you can increase the intensity by speeding up the movements, but it is important that you stay safe throughout and stay within your limits.

2. Adapted Yoga

Many of us live mostly sedentary lifestyles, so exercises that encourage different types of movement is useful. Yoga is, therefore, perfect for this, and can be gentle too.

As well as wheelchair users, I have used sitting yoga with elderly clients and those who experience pain when they walk. It is very effective at increasing blood flow, practising flexibility and promoting the healthy movement of the upper body.

There are lots of yoga videos targeted toward wheelchair users, but this video from the Matt Hampson Foundation will work for everyone. It’s especially useful if you suffer from compromised mobility.

It’s also worth visiting the YouTube channel of Adaptive Yoga. It’s been running regular live classes and has already built up quite a library for you to explore.

You could also try joining Access Rating‘s yoga sessions, on every Sunday from 11 to 11.30 am, by visiting its Facebook page.

3. Wheelchair aerobics

Aerobic workouts can lower your blood pressure, strengthen your immune system and improve your cardiovascular health.

Wheely Good Fitness has been hosting a number of wheelchair-focused videos during this period of lockdown on its Wheely Good Fitness YouTube channel, including great aerobic sessions!

Alternatively, you can also order its home exercise DVDs to choose from its variety of workouts.

And if you do not use a wheelchair, you can still join in! Most videos have a standing variation of the exercises.

At the beginning of last year, Kris from Wheely Good Fitness also filmed six exercises sessions for our DHorizons Tribe members. Visit our DHorizons Tribe Facebook page to view them all.

4. Dance classes for everyone

Whatever your skill level, anybody can dance! I admit, I may not be a very good dancer (at all), but when I am home alone, I love to turn on some music and bust a move. Dancing is an enjoyable, and very effective, way to burn calories.

Infinite Flow Dance, an inclusive dance company, has been showcasing what disabled dancers can do for years. Now, with the current Covid-19 outbreak, it is hosting regular inclusive online dance classes on its Facebook page.

These are ones you do not want to miss, so get involved! And here is an example of a fun one (once over the initial tech issues)!

https://www.facebook.com/e51dbd4c-cc0b-438b-a24e-9c660125b290

5. Gentle stretching and movement

Consistent movement is a vital necessity for all of us, but particularly if you’re managing the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

That’s why Parkinson’s UK has launched a series of online exercise classes, designed using gentle exercises. Although they are targetted at those with Parkinson’s, they would also be useful for anyone who would prefer low-intensity exercise.

Developed by specialist Parkinson’s physiotherapists, the virtual classes will include cardiovascular exercises, balance exercises and chair-based exercises. They are designed to improve your strength and flexibility.

Here is an example of a simple balancing session, but you can visit the Parkinson’s UK YouTube channel for many more.

6. High energy workout

Similar to the aerobic video above, this video from BORP, a not for profit organisation that runs fitness programmes and activities for people with disabilities in the US, is sure to get you both exercising and smiling.

Entitled Move to the Beats, it showcases a number of different wheelchair users doing different intensities of the class, enabling you to join in, no matter what your level of fitness.

You also don’t have to be a wheelchair user – these moves can be done just the same from a normal chair.

It’s worth also visiting the BORP YouTube channel as it has a couple of strengthening videos as well.

7. Quick seated workout

Even though we’re stuck at home, many of us have somehow managed to fill all our time with regular Zoom calls, family quizzes and maybe even crafts or gardening, making fitting in a workout harder.

Many of the videos I have shared here are 20 to 30 minutes long. But this one from fitness trainer Lucy Wyndham-Reed is just four minutes – so there’s no excuse to not have a go.

It’s a seated video, with clear instructions and additional adaptions, depending on your needs, so should be suitable for lots of people.

If you head to Lucy’s YouTube channel, she also has a few other workouts for disabled people or those with injuries or in recovery.

8. Dance Classes for children

It’ not just adults that need to keep their fitness levels up during lockdown – it’s just as important for kids too.

Flamingo Chicks, a community allowing children with disabilities to enjoy dance and movement, has launched free virtual classes.

They’re designed to teach children dance moves at the same time as learning. They cover a range of topics, from science (like the one below) to maths, and can be found on the Flamingo Chicks website.

The classes are specially designed with disabled children in mind, and can be a lifesaver for parents running out of appropriate activities for their kids!

If you’re keen to keep your kids active during lockdown, it’s also worth visiting the Get Set campaign created by Paralympics GB. It has a whole host of resources and activities for kids and schools.

Check out Mish’s previous article, 6 ways to stay fit and healthy during the lockdown.

You can also find out more about Mish and his fitness business, as well as contact him, by visiting his website Build Your Fitness.

By Mish Choudhury

Source: https://disabilityhorizons.com/2020/05/8-exercise-videos-for-disabled-people-during-isolation/?ml_subscriber=1428929240010593437&ml_subscriber_hash=o3c8&utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=10_exercise_videos_for_disabled_people_during_lockdown&utm_term=2020-05-25

 

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[TEDx Talk] Seeing the Potential in Brain Recovery | Mike Studer – YouTube

 

NOTE FROM TED: Please do not look to this talk for medical advice. This talk only represents the speaker’s personal views and understanding of recovery and lacks legitimate scientific support. We’ve flagged this talk because it falls outside the content guidelines TED gives TEDx organizers. TEDx events are independently organized by volunteers. The guidelines we give TEDx organizers are described in more detail here: http://storage.ted.com/tedx/manuals/t…

The processes by which the brain can learn new information, or recover after injury, are known as neuroplasticity. In this presentation, we reveal actual applications using our latest understandings of exactly how to maximize neuroplasticity for people recovering from stroke, Parkinson’s Disease, concussion, and more! Mike Studer, PT, MHS, NCS, CEEAA, CWT, CSST is a physical therapist certified as a neurological clinical specialist. He has been a PT for nearly 30 years, conducting research, writing papers and book chapters on topics ranging from stroke rehabilitation, cognition, Parkinson’s Disease, dual tasking, and much more. He has presented by invitation to 48 states, 4 provinces in Canada, 9 countries, and 3 continents. His full-time clinical practice is located in Salem, Oregon at Northwest Rehabilitation Associates. As an avid marathoner, and health nut/longevity nerd, Mike can be easily engaged on his thoughts about exercise, nutrition, sleep, and learning! http://www.mikestuder.com This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

via Seeing the Potential in Brain Recovery | Mike Studer | TEDxSalem – YouTube

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[TED-Ed] Is marijuana bad for your brain? Anees Bahji. – Video Animation

In 1970, marijuana was classified as a schedule 1 drug in the United States: the strictest designation possible, meaning it was completely illegal and had no recognized medical uses. Today, marijuana’s therapeutic benefits are widely acknowledged, but a growing recognition for its medical value doesn’t answer the question: is recreational marijuana use bad for your brain? Anees Bahji investigates.

via Is marijuana bad for your brain? – Anees Bahji | TED-Ed

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[VIDEO] Seeing the Potential in Brain Recovery – YouTube, TEDx

The processes by which the brain can learn new information, or recover after injury, are known as neuroplasticity. In this presentation, we reveal actual applications using our latest understandings of exactly how to maximize neuroplasticity for people recovering from stroke, Parkinson’s Disease, concussion, and more! Mike Studer, PT, MHS, NCS, CEEAA, CWT, CSST is a physical therapist certified as a neurological clinical specialist. He has been a PT for nearly 30 years, conducting research, writing papers and book chapters on topics ranging from stroke rehabilitation, cognition, Parkinson’s Disease, dual tasking, and much more. He has presented by invitation to 48 states, 4 provinces in Canada, 9 countries, and 3 continents. His full-time clinical practice is located in Salem, Oregon at Northwest Rehabilitation Associates. As an avid marathoner, and health nut/longevity nerd, Mike can be easily engaged on his thoughts about exercise, nutrition, sleep, and learning! http://www.mikestuder.com This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

via Seeing the Potential in Brain Recovery | Mike Studer | TEDxSalem – YouTube

 

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[WEB PAGE] Physical Therapy at Home – Gorbel Rehab – Videos

Physical Therapy at Home

As rehab professionals around the world work to address patient needs during the COVID-19 pandemic, Gorbel is actively taking steps to improve efforts in delivering therapy during these difficult times. The Gorbel team of physical therapists have created a library of home exercise program videos for those patients who are now unable to receive therapy with the frequency or duration in which they normally would have. The current video categories are Strength, Range of Motion, Balance, and Caregiver Training. Each category has a ‘Playlist’ that includes multiple videos. We will continue to add categories and new videos in our commitment to assist your efforts to advance your patient’s recovery.

Stay safe, healthy and thank you for all you do.
Brian Reh, CEO Gorbel®

 

Physical Therapy Videos

Balance Videos Playlist  /  Caregiver Videos Playlist  /  Range of Motion Videos Playlist  /  Strength Videos Playlist

Balance Videos Playlist

Caregiver Videos Playlist

Range of Motion Videos Playlist

Strength Videos Playlist

 

Physical Therapist Bio

Matthew KlockMatthew Klock PT,DPT I am a licensed physical therapist in New York State and the Northeast Account Manager for Gorbel® Rehabilitation. Before joining Gorbel® I worked for Ochsner Health System in New Orleans, LA as the Supervisor of the Ochsner Sports Medicine Clinic. My passions include sports and orthopedics as well as new and emerging technologies. I believe that physical therapists should serve their patients by applying their wealth of knowledge in rehabilitation and pair it with the most cutting edge technologies to get the most out of every treatment.

 

Ramiro MaldonadoRamiro Maldonado PT, DPT I am a licensed Physical Therapist in New York State as well as the Clinical Business Development Specialist for Gorbel Rehabilitation. During my ten years as a clinician, my clinical interests lead me to specialize in vestibular and neuromuscular impairment, and I have completed the vestibular competency at Emory University. My passion now lies in helping patients and therapists by increasing awareness of rehabilitation technology and how it can improve patient outcomes. You can find out more about the products I represent, innovations in physical therapy, and me at TheBalancePT.com or follow me on Twitter or Instagram @RamiroDPT. Thank you!! 

Heidi ShenkHeidi Shenk, PT I am a licensed Physical Therapist in the states of Ohio and Indiana as well as the Account Manager for the Great Lakes Region of Gorbel Rehabilitation. I am a graduate of the Doisy College of Health Sciences at St Louis University. During my twenty-seven years as a clinician, my clinical interests led me to specialize in occupational medicine, outpatient orthopedics and in women’s health. My lifelong interest in technology and in improving therapist safety and patient outcomes has led to a passion in increasing awareness of rehabilitation technology and how it can improve patient care.

via Physical Therapy at Home | Gorbel Rehab

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