Archive for category Video

[VIDEO] Is EPiLEPSY Predictable? – YouTube

Epilepsy is a chronic disease characterized by recurrent seizures. Epilepsy is believed to be a random occurrence of spontaneous seizures. One of the most disabling aspects of having epilepsy is the seeming randomness of seizures. Epilepsy researchers around the world have been working for decades to identify patterns of electrical activity in the brain that signal an oncoming seizure, but with limited success, it may soon be possible for clinicians to identify when patients are at highest risk for seizures, allowing patients to plan around these brief but potentially dangerous events. Some people can feel a seizure coming on, brief storms of electrical activity in the brain cause convulsions, hallucinations, or loss of consciousness. Due to abnormal electrical activity in the brain numerous symptoms, including a loss of awareness or consciousness, changes in the senses, hallucinations, numbness, feelings of electric shocks, drooling, convulsions and difficulty in breathing occurs. After the seizure, people can be unresponsive, confused, scared or tired, among other lingering effects.

 

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[VIDEO] What is Functional Electrical Stimulation ? – Billy Woods from Active Linx – YouTube

Video from http://www.medfaxxinc.com explains what is muscle stimulator,correctly a Functional Electrical Stimulator(FES),is for rehab.following stroke,to retard disuse atrophy,reduce swelling&edema&help patients regain function. TNS is not a MS unit but a pain machine. Some FES units can be functional restoration machines.

via What is Functional Electrical Stimulation ? – Billy Woods from Active Linx – YouTube

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[VIDEO] Homonymous Hemianopia – YouTube

via Homonymous Hemianopia – YouTube

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[WEB SITE] Doctors Successfully ‘Rewire’ The Brain Of People With Depression.(Video)

Americans spend billions of dollars each year on antidepressants, but the National Institutes of Health estimates that those medications work for only 60 percent to 70 percent of people who take them. In addition, the number of people with depression has increased 18 percent since 2005, according to the World Health Organization, which this year launched a global campaign encouraging people to seek treatment.

The Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA is one of a handful of hospitals and clinics nationwide that offer a treatment that works in a fundamentally different way than drugs. The technique, transcranial magnetic stimulation, beams targeted magnetic pulses deep inside patients’ brains — an approach that has been likened to rewiring a computer.

TMS has been approved by the FDA for treating depression that doesn’t respond to medications, and UCLA researchers say it has been underused. But new equipment being rolled out this summer promises to make the treatment available to more people.

“We are actually changing how the brain circuits are arranged, how they talk to each other,” said Dr. Ian Cook, director of the UCLA Depression Research and Clinic Program. “The brain is an amazingly changeable organ. In fact, every time people learn something new, there are physical changes in the brain structure that can be detected.”

Nathalie DeGravel, 48, of Los Angeles had tried multiple medications and different types of therapy, not to mention many therapists, for her depression before she heard about magnetic stimulation. She discussed it with her psychiatrist earlier this year, and he readily referred her to UCLA.

Within a few weeks, she noticed relief from the back pain she had been experiencing; shortly thereafter, her depression began to subside. DeGravel says she can now react more “wisely” to life’s daily struggles, feels more resilient and is  able to do much more around the house. She even updated her resume to start looking for a job for the first time in years.

During TMS therapy, the patient sits in a reclining chair, much like one used in a dentist’s office, and a technician places a magnetic stimulator against the patient’s head in a predetermined location, based on calibrations from brain imaging.

Dr. Andrew Leuchter talks with a patient who is about to undergo transcranial magnetic stimulation, which treats depression by sending magnetic pulses to a specific area of the brain. Credit: UCLA

The stimulator sends a series of magnetic pulses into the brain. People who have undergone the treatment commonly report the sensation is like having someone tapping their head, and because of the clicking sound it makes, patients often wear earphones or earplugs during a session.

TMS therapy normally takes 30 minutes to an hour, and people typically receive the treatment several days a week for six weeks. But the newest generation of equipment could make treatments less time-consuming.

“There are new TMS devices recently approved by the FDA that will allow patients to achieve the benefits of the treatment in a much shorter period of time,” said Dr. Andrew Leuchter, director of the Semel Institute’s TMS clinical and research service. “For some patients, we will have the ability to decrease the length of a treatment session from 37.5 minutes down to 3 minutes, and to complete a whole course of TMS in two weeks.”

Leuchter said some studies have shown that TMS is even better than medication for the treatment of chronic depression. The approach, he says, is underutilized.

“We are used to thinking of psychiatric treatments mostly in terms of either talk therapies, psychotherapy or medications,” Leuchter said. “TMS is a revolutionary kind of treatment.”

Bob Holmes of Los Angeles is one of the 16 million Americans who report having a major depressive episode each year, and he has suffered from depression his entire life. He calls the TMS treatment he received at UCLA Health a lifesaver.

“What this did was sort of reawaken everything, and it provided that kind of jolt to get my brain to start to work again normally,” he said.

Doctors are also exploring whether the treatment could also be used for a variety of other conditions including schizophrenia, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease and chronic pain.

“We’re still just beginning to scratch the surface of what this treatment might be able to do for patients with a variety of illnesses,” Leuchter said. “It’s completely noninvasive and is usually very well tolerated.”

via Doctors Successfully ‘Rewire’ The Brain Of People With Depression

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[VIDEO] Soft Robotic Glove – Vimeo

 

The soft robotic glove under development at the Wyss Institute could one day be an assistive device used for grasping objects, which could help patients suffering from muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), incomplete spinal cord injury, or other hand impairments to regain some daily independence and control of their environment.

This research is partially funded by the National Science Foundation.

For more information, please visit: wyss.harvard.edu/viewpressrelease/200

via Soft Robotic Glove on Vimeo

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[VIDEO] SaeboStim Micro Combined with Mirror Therapy – YouTube

 

Saebo, Inc. is a medical device company primarily engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of affordable and novel clinical solutions designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 100,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence. In 2001, two occupational therapists had one simple, but powerful goal – to provide neurological clients access to transformative and life changing products. At the time, treatment options for improving arm and hand function were limited. The technology that did exist was expensive and inaccessible for home use. With inadequate therapy options often leading to unfavorable outcomes, health professionals routinely told their clients that they have “reached a plateau” or “no further gains can be made”. The founders believed that it was not the clients who had plateaued, but rather their treatment options had plateaued. Saebo’s commitment – “No Plateau in Sight” – was inspired by this mentality; and the accessible, revolutionary solutions began. Saebo’s revolutionary product offering was based on the latest advances in rehabilitation research. From the SaeboFlex which allows clients to incorporate their hand functionally in therapy or at home, to the SaeboMAS, an unweighting device used to assist the arm during daily living tasks and exercise training, “innovation” and “affordability” can now be used in the same sentence. Over the last ten years, Saebo has grown into a leading global provider of rehabilitative products created through the unrelenting leadership and the strong network of clinicians around the world. As we celebrate our history and helping more than 100,000 clients regain function, we are growing this commitment to affordability and accessibility even further by making our newest, most innovative products more accessible than ever.

via SaeboStim Micro Combined with Mirror Therapy – YouTube

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[VIDEO] 5 Tips for Surviving the Holidays with an mTBI — How to manage your TBI & still enjoy the holidays – YouTube

Kim & Brie are back! This time they’re here to give you some tips on how to comfortably celebrate the holidays after a TBI. Post Concussion Syndrome can make holidays even more overwhelming than usual, but some forethought and planning can help. The TBI Rockstars guide you through some of their own holiday experiences post brain injury.

 

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[VIDEO] tDCS – Transcranial direct current stimulation CIDIMU Group – YouTube

Published on Nov 24, 2017

 

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[VIDEO] Henry Hoffman Q&A Video Series: Can Patients Years Following Stroke Actually Make Progress? – YouTube

Saebo, Inc. is a medical device company primarily engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of affordable and novel clinical solutions designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 100,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence. In 2001, two occupational therapists had one simple, but powerful goal – to provide neurological clients access to transformative and life changing products. At the time, treatment options for improving arm and hand function were limited. The technology that did exist was expensive and inaccessible for home use. With inadequate therapy options often leading to unfavorable outcomes, health professionals routinely told their clients that they have “reached a plateau” or “no further gains can be made”. The founders believed that it was not the clients who had plateaued, but rather their treatment options had plateaued. Saebo’s commitment – “No Plateau in Sight” – was inspired by this mentality; and the accessible, revolutionary solutions began. Saebo’s revolutionary product offering was based on the latest advances in rehabilitation research. From the SaeboFlex which allows clients to incorporate their hand functionally in therapy or at home, to the SaeboMAS, an unweighting device used to assist the arm during daily living tasks and exercise training, “innovation” and “affordability” can now be used in the same sentence. Over the last ten years, Saebo has grown into a leading global provider of rehabilitative products created through the unrelenting leadership and the strong network of clinicians around the world. As we celebrate our history and helping more than 100,000 clients regain function, we are growing this commitment to affordability and accessibility even further by making our newest, most innovative products more accessible than ever.

via Henry Hoffman Q&A Video Series: Can Patients Years Following Stroke Actually Make Progress? – YouTube

 

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[VIDEO] Can functional electrical stimulation restore function? – YouTube

Daniel Becker, MD | The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and INI October 21, 2017

via Can functional electrical stimulation restore function? – YouTube

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