Posts Tagged Hand

[VIDEO] Pablo Product Film – YouTube

Δημοσιεύτηκε στις 18 Ιουλ 2017

The PABLO is the latest in a long row of clinically tried and tested robotic- and computer-assisted therapy devices for arms and hands. The new design and the specially developed tyroS software make the PABLO more flexible and offer an expanded spectrum of therapy options.

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[Abstract] Preliminary study on the design and control of a pneumatically-actuated hand rehabilitation device

Abstract:

In recent years, the robotic devices have been used in hand rehabilitation training practice. The majority of existing robotic devices for rehabilitation belong to the rigid exoskeleton. However, rigid exoskeletons may have some limitations such as heavy weight, un-safety and inconvenience. This paper presents a device designed to help post-stroke patients to stretch their spastic hands. This hand rehabilitation device actuator is fabricated by soft material, powered with fluid pressure, and embedded in one glove surface. The distinguished features of this device are: safety, low cost, light weight, convenience and pneumatic actuation. In clinical practice, rehabilitation therapists should help the post-stroke patients to stretch fingers to a desired joint position. Therefore, the control objective of the proposed hand rehabilitation device is to drive the patient’s finger bending angle to a predesigned position. To this end, curvature sensors embedded in the glove are used to measure the finger’s bending angle. A commercial data glove is used to collect the actual finger’s bending angle for calibrating the curvature sensors based on a three-layer back-propagation (BP) neural network. Then the error between the designed joint position and the actual joint position can be calculated. An error proportional control strategy is adopted for the positioning control objective (the controller’s input is the pump speed). Finally, experiments are conducted to validate the effectiveness of control method and the capacity of the proposed hand rehabilitation device.

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Source: Preliminary study on the design and control of a pneumatically-actuated hand rehabilitation device – IEEE Xplore Document

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[WEB SITE] Robotic-Assisted Rehabilitation Therapy Designed to Aid Stroke Recovery

Pictured here is the experimental setup for the estimation of the 3 DOF human forearm and wrist impedance. (Photo courtesy of UNIST)

Pictured here is the experimental setup for the estimation of the 3 DOF human forearm and wrist impedance. (Photo courtesy of UNIST)

Scientists from Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) have developed a new robotic tool to assess muscle overactivity and movement dysfunction in stroke survivors.

They suggest, in a study published recently in IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, that their robotic-assisted rehabilitation therapy may help improve the stroke patients’ mobility.

The study was led by Professor Sang Hoon Kang of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at UNIST in collaboration with Professor Pyung-Hun Chang of DGIST and Dr Kyungbin Park of Samsung Electronics Co Ltd, according to a media release from UNIST.

In their study, Kang and the others on the team developed a rehabilitation robotic system that quantitatively measures the 3 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) impedance of human forearm and wrist in minutes.

Using their impedance estimation device, which they call the distal internal model based impedance control (dIMBIC)-based method, the team was able to accurately characterize the 3 DOF forearm and wrist impedance, including inertia, damping, and stiffness, for the first time, the release continues.

“The dIMBIC-based method can be used to assist in the quantitative and objective evaluation of neurological disorders, like stroke,” Kang says, in the release. “Findings from this study will open a new chapter in robot-assisted rehabilitation in the workplace accident rehabilitation hospitals, as well as in nursing homes and assisted living facilities.”

The research team expects that, in the long run, the proposed 3 DOF impedance estimation may promote wrist and forearm motor control studies and complement the diagnosis of the alteration in wrist and forearm resistance post-stroke by providing objective impedance values including cross-coupled terms, the release concludes.

[Source(s): Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Science Daily]

Source: Robotic-Assisted Rehabilitation Therapy Designed to Aid Stroke Recovery – Rehab Managment

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[BLOG POST] Which Saebo Hand Rehabilitation Device is Right For You? – Saebo

 


In 2001, two occupational therapists had one goal: to provide neurological clients access to transformative and life-changing products for improving arm and hand function. Frustrated with the current devices on the market that were limited, expensive, and inaccessible for home use, the founders were inspired to create new, revolutionary solutions.

What started as a dream has now become Saebo, a global provider of affordable rehabilitative products designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 200,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence.

At Saebo, we have three core product lines for hand rehabilitation: The SaeboFlex, SaeboGlove, and SaeboStretch. These three products have helped numerous people overcome limited motor function after suffering a stroke or other neurological or orthopedic condition.

We would love for you to get to know more about these three products and learn about why they work, and more importantly, who they can help. We have committed to making products that are unique and based on the most recent research and evidence available. Learn about three of our unique products:

 

 

SaeboFlex

The SaeboFlex is a high-profile orthosis with an outrigger system that covers the back of hand, fingertips and forearm. This orthosis positions the wrist and fingers into extension to prepare them for object manipulation. With the assistance of the SaeboFlex, the user is able to grasp objects by voluntarily flexing his or her fingers. Once the fingers relax (stop gripping), the extension spring system assists in re-opening the hand to release the object.

Saebo’s functional dynamic orthoses are specifically designed for people suffering from a neurological injury such as a stroke, head injury, and incomplete spinal cord injury. The SaeboFlex gives people the ability to perform grasp-and-release activities, which allows them to participate in task-oriented hand training. Evidence-based research supports this training as critical to recovery. The SaeboFlex is appropriate for individuals with minimal to severe tone/spasticity.

Here is an example of a man trying to pick up a ball six weeks after his stroke with and without the SaeboFlex. You can also see his improvement after six months of training:

SaeboGlove

The SaeboGlove is a low-profile, lightweight glove that helps clients suffering from neurological and orthopedic injuries incorporate their hand functionally in therapy and at home. The proprietary tension system has elastic bands that offer various tensions for individual finger joints. The tension system extends the client’s fingers and thumb following grasping and assists with hand opening.

The ideal candidate for the SaeboGlove is suffering from minimal to no spasticity or contracture. People with more severe soft-tissue shortening would need a high-profile orthosis like the SaeboFlex. For appropriate candidates, the SaeboGlove can be worn to assist with day-to-day functional tasks and during grasp-and-release exercises/activities. This new-found freedom leads to improved motor recovery and functional independence.

This video shows a man attempting grasp-and-release activities with and without the assistance of the SaeboGlove:

SaeboStretch

The SaeboStretch is a soft and adjustable dynamic resting hand splint recognizable for its unique strapping system. This splint is worn to stretch and prevent soft-tissue shortening and helps neurologically impaired clients maintain or improve motion. Saebo’s energy-storing technology allows individuals suffering from spasticity to stretch comfortably and safely, resulting in increased motivation and compliance.

The SaeboStretch is appropriate for people suffering from minimal to moderate spasticity. The orthosis includes the choice of three tension plates that offer various levels of resistance depending on the amount of tone and spasticity the individual has. The flexible hand plates also prevent or minimize joint pain and deformities. The SaeboStretch can be worn during the day or when sleeping.

See how the SaeboStretch is custom fit to the individual in this video:

Our Expert Recommendations

Over the last ten years, Saebo has grown into a leading global provider of rehabilitative products created through the unrelenting leadership and the strong network of clinicians around the world. We are growing this commitment to affordability and accessibility even further by making our newest, most innovative products more available than ever.

If your loved one is recovering from a neurological or orthopedic injury and wants to know if one of Saebo’s products is right for them, take our free 5-minute evaluation. Completing this survey will provide all of the information needed to ensure the best possible product recommendations. Upon completion of your survey, you will receive personalized suggestions tailored to your specific needs and abilities. In addition, our Product Specialists will be happy to review these recommendations with your physician or therapist.


All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

Source: Which Saebo Hand Rehabilitation Device is Right For You? | Saebo

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[ARTICLE] Use of Hand Rehabilitation Board (Dominic’s Board) in Post Traumatic/ Stroke Rehabilitation of the Upper Limbs – Full Text PDF

ABSTRACT
In recent years, the increasing number of patients with upper limb musculoskeletal disorders seeking timely, intensive, prolonged and task oriented hospital- and home- based physical rehabilitation, and the decreasing numbers of trained therapist to provide the needed care, have left a palpable gab. These have resulted in several preventable deformities with associated complications leading to social and economic burdens. Although the introduction of some robotic devices has addressed some of these concerns, the shortfalls from the use of these devices limit their effectiveness. The newly introduced hand rehabilitation board (Dominic’s Board) was prospectively evaluated in 82 patients with ULMDs of different etiologies to assess its therapeutic effi cacy in rehabilitation of ULMDs. Additive, but complementary effect was observed when used along with conventional hospital-based therapy and at home, suggesting the effectiveness of this device in preventing or ameliorating the complications associated with ULMDs.

INTRODUCTION

Upper limb musculoskeletal disorders (ULMDs) are disorders affecting muscles, bones, tendons, nerves and blood vessels of the neck, shoulders, elbows, arms and hands [1]. They are common and debilitating and are associated with functional impairment including interference with daily activities such as eating, dressing, washing clothes, dificulty shopping and carrying a shopping bag as well as dificulty with hobbies. There are growing numbers of patients with ULMDs leading to varying prevalence across different populations. However, the prevalence ranges from 58% to 81% [2,3] and may be inluenced by the socio-demographic characteristics of the study participants and other covariates. Due to the high prevalence and associated disabilities, ULMDs frequently lead to higher health care use with many patients presenting in the primary care centers and rheumatology clinics [4]. Because these deformities limit patients’ upper limb functionality, and hence independence, they are always in dire need for assistant both at the rehabilitation centers and at home. Also, since the restoration of upper limb functionality depends signiicantly on the onset, duration, intensity and task orientation of the training [5], home based physical therapy/care has become a signiicant component of physical rehabilitation of patients with ULMDs. However, the increasing demand for home base physical therapy/care is despite the unavailability of enough trained therapist and care givers to provide this very important component of rehabilitation therapy and care.[…]

Full Text PDF

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[Abstract+References] A therapy-driven gamification framework for hand rehabilitation

Abstract

Rehabilitative therapy is usually very expensive and confined to specialized rehabilitation centers or hospitals, leading to slower recovery times for corresponding patients. Therefore, there is a high demand for the development of technology-based personalized solutions to guide and encourage patients towards performing online rehabilitation program that can help them live independently at home. This paper introduces an innovative e-health framework that develops adaptive serious games for people with hand disabilities. The aim of this work is to provide a patient-adaptive environment for the gamification of hand therapies in order to facilitate and encourage rehabilitation issues. Theoretical foundations (i.e., therapy and patient models) and algorithms to match therapy-based hand gestures to navigational movements in 3D space within the serious game environment have been developed. A novel game generation module is introduced, which translates those movements into a 3D therapy-driven route on a real-world map and with different levels of difficulty based on the patient profile and capabilities. In order to enrich the user navigation experience, a 3D spatio-temporal validation region is also generated, which tracks and adjusts the patient movements throughout the session. The gaming environment also creates and adds semantics to different types of attractive and repellent objects in space depending on the difficulty level of the game. Relevant benchmarks to assess the patient interaction with the environment along with a usability and performance testing of our framework are introduced to ensure quantitative as well as qualitative improvements. Trial tests in one disability center were conducted with a total number of five subjects, having hand motor controls problems, who used our gamified physiotherapy solution to help us in measuring the usability and users’ satisfaction levels. The obtained results and feedback from therapists and patients are very encouraging.

Source: A therapy-driven gamification framework for hand rehabilitation | SpringerLink

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[Abstract] Hand strengthening exercises in chronic stroke patients: Dose-response evaluation using electromyography

Abstract

Study Design

Cross-sectional.

Purpose of the Study

This study evaluates finger flexion and extension strengthening exercises using elastic resistance in chronic stroke patients.

Methods

Eighteen stroke patients (mean age: 56.8 ± 7.6 years) with hemiparesis performed 3 consecutive repetitions of finger flexion and extension, using 3 different elastic resistance levels (easy, moderate, and hard). Surface electromyography was recorded from the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and extensor digitorum (ED) muscles and normalized to the maximal electromyography of the non-paretic arm.

Results

Maximal grip strength was 39.2 (standard deviation: 12.5) and 7.8 kg (standard deviation: 9.4) in the nonparetic and paretic hand, respectively. For the paretic hand, muscle activity was higher during finger flexion exercise than during finger extension exercise for both ED (30% [95% confidence interval {CI}: 19-40] vs 15% [95% CI: 5-25] and FDS (37% [95% CI: 27-48] vs 24% [95% CI: 13-35]). For the musculature of both the FDS and ED, no dose-response association was observed for resistance and muscle activity during the flexion exercise (P > .05).

Conclusion

The finger flexion exercise showed higher muscle activity in both the flexor and extensor musculature of the forearm than the finger extension exercise. Furthermore, greater resistance did not result in higher muscle activity during the finger flexion exercise. The present results suggest that the finger flexion exercise should be the preferred strengthening exercise to achieve high levels of muscle activity in both flexor and extensor forearm muscles in chronic stroke patients. The finger extension exercise may be performed with emphasis on improving neuromuscular control.

Level of Evidence

4b.

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[Abstract] Hand strengthening exercises in chronic stroke patients: Dose-response evaluation using electromyography

Abstract

Study Design

Cross-sectional.

Purpose of the Study

This study evaluates finger flexion and extension strengthening exercises using elastic resistance in chronic stroke patients.

Methods

Eighteen stroke patients (mean age: 56.8 ± 7.6 years) with hemiparesis performed 3 consecutive repetitions of finger flexion and extension, using 3 different elastic resistance levels (easy, moderate, and hard). Surface electromyography was recorded from the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and extensor digitorum (ED) muscles and normalized to the maximal electromyography of the non-paretic arm.

Results

Maximal grip strength was 39.2 (standard deviation: 12.5) and 7.8 kg (standard deviation: 9.4) in the nonparetic and paretic hand, respectively. For the paretic hand, muscle activity was higher during finger flexion exercise than during finger extension exercise for both ED (30% [95% confidence interval {CI}: 19-40] vs 15% [95% CI: 5-25] and FDS (37% [95% CI: 27-48] vs 24% [95% CI: 13-35]). For the musculature of both the FDS and ED, no dose-response association was observed for resistance and muscle activity during the flexion exercise (P > .05).

Conclusion

The finger flexion exercise showed higher muscle activity in both the flexor and extensor musculature of the forearm than the finger extension exercise. Furthermore, greater resistance did not result in higher muscle activity during the finger flexion exercise. The present results suggest that the finger flexion exercise should be the preferred strengthening exercise to achieve high levels of muscle activity in both flexor and extensor forearm muscles in chronic stroke patients. The finger extension exercise may be performed with emphasis on improving neuromuscular control.

Level of Evidence

4b.

Source: Hand strengthening exercises in chronic stroke patients: Dose-response evaluation using electromyography – Journal of Hand Therapy

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[WEB SITE] Regain Use of Arm After Stroke – National Stroke Association

Regain Use of Arm After Stroke
Technology Now Widely Available Means Moderately to Severely Weakened Arms and Hands May Function Again

Experiencing a stroke can be devastating.  Many are left with an arm so weak it seems useless.  The biggest loss can be your independence.

But for many, regaining use of your arm and hand and your independence is possible.  Myomo, a medical robotics company, has developed the MyoPro—a lightweight, non-invasive powered brace (orthosis). It is the only orthosis that, sensing a patient’s own neurological signals through sensors on the surface of the skin, can restore their ability to use their arms and hands so that they can return to work, live independently and reduce their cost of care.

Hundreds of patients have used it successfully.  It is recommended by clinicians at leading rehabilitation facilities and 20 VA hospitals. (MyoPro is not for everyone and your results may vary.)

Read the whitepaper Technology Giving Hope to Stroke Patients Now Widely Available and see videos of patients and physicians describing their experience with MyoPro.

LEARN MORE

Source: National Stroke Association

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[Abstract+References] Development of a tool to facilitate real life activity retraining in hand and arm therapy

Successful recovery of upper extremity function after stroke is more likely when the affected limb is used regularly in daily life. We developed an iPad (Apple) application called the ‘Aid for Decision-Making in Occupation Choice for Hand’ to facilitate daily upper extremity use. This study examined the suitability of items and pictures in the Aid for Decision-Making in Occupation Choice for Hand, and tested a paper prototype of the application (which has since been produced).

We used a Delphi method with 10 expert occupational therapists to refine the items in the aid. Next, we prepared pictures of items in the aid and confirmed their suitability by testing them with 10 patients (seven stroke, three cervical spondylotic myelopathy). Nine occupational therapists conducted field tests with a paper prototype of the aid in clinical practice to examine its utility.

After four Delphi rounds, we selected 130 items representing activities of daily living, organized into 16 categories. Of 130 pictures, 128 were recognizable to patients as representing the intended activities. Based on testing of the paper prototype, we found the Aid for Decision-Making in Occupation Choice for Hand process was suitable for clinical practice, and could be organized into six steps.

The Aid for Decision-Making in Occupation Choice for Hand process may promote daily upper extremity use. This application, since developed, now needs to be clinically tested in its digital form.

 

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Source: Development of a tool to facilitate real life activity retraining in hand and arm therapy – Mar 28, 2017

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